8 Days to the kick off: featured session of the day - ReactJS in a real world application by Emanuele DelBono

Yesterday we've featured a talk about AngularJS and today, with 8 days to kickoff, the featured session is ReactJS in a real world application and we asked Emanuele DelBono to tell us more about his session and about himself.

Q: Tell us a bit more about your session

A: I'm using react for almost a year now and after an initial skepticism I had fallen in love with it. And it's not only about react itself but all the environment and tools and communities around it.

During my session I would like to pass some of my enthusiasm to the people, I would like to show that in just one hour everybody will be able to write a complete app. React is easy, is not magic, is what you write is what you get.

I will give a brief introduction of the basic concepts on which react is based and then I will show the support tools and libraries that are useful to write complex applications. In the end I will try to write some React components so that people will be able to see how easy it is and how a real world application should be developed.

Q: Tell us a bit more about yourself

A: I'm a software developer, I work in CodicePlastico a small software house formed by seven superhero-developers. I develop mostly web applications in ASP.NET and Node.js. I like crafting application using basic tools: a terminal, some scripts and an editor. I love to learn new tools, languages and practices. During the last year I've became a fan of frontend developer, previously with Angular and now with React.

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If you want to attend this session but haven't registered to the Web European Conference yet, you still have some time: go register before all 900 tickets are gone.

9 Days to the kick off: featured session of the day - Node.js Authentication and Data Security by Tim Messerschmidt

With 9 days the Web European Conference, the featured session is Node.js Authentication and Data Security and we asked Tim Messerschmidt to tell us more about his session and about himself.

Q: Tell us a bit more about your session

A: My session Node.js Authentication and Data Security uses the OWASP Top 10 in order to explain common security issues that Node developers encounter. Using Express as a sample platform, I will be going through useful middleware and settings that help hardening your web framework.

Furthermore I'll be covering an area, where terms are often being confused: Authorization and Authentication. It is important to understand that user identity does not necessarily mean granting access to resources and vice versa - effectively this even means that not every identity that is being available across the web necessarily fits every application.

The last topic I want to dive into is data hardening. After covering the basics like key stretching, how hashing works and why leveraging a salt makes sense, I'll compare a few hashing algorithms and will explain when they make sense and when they don't make sense.

Overall this session aims to educate about current security threats. We're living in an era where big services like Ashley Madison, Slack and many more get exploited in order to retrieve user information. I want to explain how these attacks work and what developers can do in order to protect their applications.

Q: Tell us a bit more about yourself

A: I am running PayPal's and Braintree's Developer Relations team in EMEA and APAC. Personally, I am coming from a mobile app and device development background before I started picking up web development. At Braintree_Dev, our team aims for supporting developers and startups across the globe. Two popular initiatives that we've started are Startup Blueprint, a program that aims at supporting early- to mid-stage startups, and BattleHack, a global hackathon format that happens in 14 cities and ends up with the finals in Silicon Valley.

At the moment both my colleague Jonathan LeBlanc and I are authoring a book around data security and identity for O'Reilly and next to this project, I have been responsible for several additions to the Mobile Developers Guide to the Galaxy.

You can find some of my thought-pieces around Developer Evangelism here and a more general purpose blog that covers multiple topics here.

Register to the Web European Conference

If you want to attend this session but haven't registered to the Web European Conference yet, you still have some time: go register before all 900 tickets are gone.

9 Days to the kick off: featured session of the day - Create a single page web application with AngularJS by Antonio Di Motta

With 9 days the beginning of the Web European Conference, this morning we feature a session from track 4, Create a single page web application with AngularJS and we asked Antonio Di Motta to tell us more about his session and about himself.

Q: Tell us a bit more about your session

A: My session will have AngularJS as main actor. We will go to understand the main characteristics of this web framework that makes simple building a Single Page Application but also how to extend the built-in directives with your own custom. To do that, we will see many examples with different levels of difficulty. There will be space also to understand how to design a complex SPA project by reference to an open source project I'm working on.

This session requires a good knowledge of html and javascript, as well as concepts like data-binding and mvc should be familiar.

Q: Tell us a bit more about yourself

A: I'm working at Mate Consulting as IT Project Engineer. In my career i have had the opportunity to work on interesting projects that have involved the real life. It’s amazing when you see your software working into an industrial or transportation plant like a metro, every decision about the design and implementation are very important and have a deep impact to the final results. I like sharing my knowledge with others and the open source its a great way to accomplish it, so i have an account on Github which is the place where I'm publishing some personal projects.

Register to the Web European Conference

If you want to attend this session but haven't registered to the Web European Conference yet, you still have some time: go register before all 900 tickets are gone.

10 Days to the kick off: featured session of the day - Optimizing web apps using AppInsights, memory and performance profiling by Maarten Balliauw

We are continuing our tour of the sessions: after a session on ASP.NET 5 and one on TypeScript we move to the Cloud with Optimizing web apps using AppInsights, memory and performance profiling and we asked Maarten Balliauw to tell us more about his session and about himself.

Q: Tell us a bit more about your session

A: The Web European Conference organizers have dubbed my session "Optimizing web apps using AppInsights, memory and performance profiling", but I kind of like the code name I use for it: "Sherlock Homepage - A detective story about running large web services". Reason for that is that this session is a real detective story about our team working on several of the issues we in the past months building out NuGet.org.

We'll start with a simple site outage and investigate the crime scene. We'll soon find out that nothing is what it seems, and that the prime suspect is still out there. We'll be using profilers, AppInsights and intuition to find out why this outage happened. We'll see tasks can be evil, and that having some knowledge about IIS, memory management and threading can help us catch our suspect.

Vague, I know, but I don't want to ruin the story - a story which you will only hear when attending Web European Conference!

Q: Tell us a bit more about yourself

A: I am a web and cloud guy, two technologies I like to speak and blog about. I work at Microsoft, building out the server-side of NuGet since a few months. Before, I've been a Microsoft Azure MVP and ASP Insider. I also co-founded MyGet, hosting private NuGet, npm and Bower feeds for teams.

Register to the Web European Conference

If you want to attend this session but haven't registered to the Web European Conference yet, you still have some time: go register before all 900 tickets are gone.

10 Days to the kick off: featured session of the day - TypeScript: the JavaScript developer best friend! by Alessandro Giorgetti

We are continuing our tour of the sessions: with 10 days the Web European Conference, the featured session is TypeScript: the JavaScript developer best friend! and we asked Alessandro Giorgetti to tell us more about his session and about himself.

Q: Tell us a bit more about your session

A: Let's pin with some strong points on the language:

  • JavaScript is one of the few true cross platform languages we have around today.
  • JavaScript is widely adopted and it's available nearly on any device these days.
  • JavaScript can - thanks to nodejs and similar projects - run even server side.
  • JavaScript is a powerful, flexible and dynamic language.
  • Learning JavaScript is quite easy (mastering it, is a whole another thing).

And some drawbacks:

  • It's a dynamic and loosely typed language: great flexibility, but you can harm yourself in a very bad way!
  • Refactoring is a nightmare!
  • Tooling sucks badly!

In today's world developing a software, a website or whatever you do, among all the other things it is also the 'art of optimizing limited resources'.

If you think about it, we have limited resources in terms of: - People that belong to our development team. - Time spent on design and coding of each person involved.

If you - like me - do not want to waste your time in useless tasks when starting (or taking control of) a project, you start with an assessment session in which you look around at all the languages that are used and which tools are available to ease your job out (and possibly avoid the juniors to make disasters to recover later).

Dealing with JavaScript, a big part of the problem is the lack of good tooling due to the dynamic nature of the language itself. To avoid common and stupid mistakes you usually need: - A good coding style guide. - The discipline to enforced that on the team. - A huge test suite to spot all the 'stupid' mistakes like mistyping a property.

Wouldn't be better if the language (and the tooling) could help us enable some of the rules - with explicit evidence of where the problem is and maybe a hint on how to correct it - and avoid us to lose time writing useless tests, while we should focus on design?

TypeScript does just that!
It's a superset of JavaScript that enforces coherence rules bringing in strong typing; it helps developer structure their 'JavaScript code' with interfaces, classes and inheritance (built upon prototypical inheritance), namespaces and modules: all the familiar constructs you have usually available in an Object Oriented language. Tooling is spectacular (compared to what we were used to have in plain JavaScript): it enables a fantastic intellisense support and Refactoring is not a nightmare anymore! It extends the actual JavaScript with features that will be available natively in the vNext.

And the best thing is: all of there are just development-time artifacts! TypeScript compiles (transpiles) to plain old 'comfortable' JavaScript to be fed to our browsers or runtimes. And the JavaScript it emits conform to the highest standards and best practices.

In short:
TypeScript helps me to be a better JavaScript developer, and it saves me time and headaches along the way. This is why this session will be cool!

Q: Tell us a bit more about yourself

A: I'm a 'software craftsman' specialized in enterprise applications for the healthcare system, with focus on service oriented applications. I have experiences in different programming languages like: C#, C++, Javascript, TypeScript... and several technologies and frameworks like .NET, ASP.NET MVC, NodeJS, HTML5, AngularJS, Nhibernate, NEventStore. I'm one of the founders and an active speaker of the .Net user group DotNetMarche. I'm also a founder and the Community Group DevMarche. Away from my normal job I've discovered (too late maybe) a passion for fitness and BBQ cooking, two things that play well together!

Register to the Web European Conference

If you want to attend this session but haven't registered to the Web European Conference yet, you still have some time: go register before all 900 tickets are gone.

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