6 Days to the kick off: featured session of the day - OData v4: the easy way of exposing and querying structured data by Raffaele Rialdi

One more featured session for this Sunday: OData v4: the easy way of exposing and querying structured data and we asked Raffaele Rialdi to tell us more about his session and about himself.

Together with Capture, record, clip, embed and play, search: video from newbie to ninja by Vito Flavio Lorusso and ReactJS in a real world application by Emanuele DelBono, this will be the second session of the afternoon, just before the coffee break. Which one will you choose? Video on Azure, ReactJS or OData?

Q: Tell us a bit more about your session

A: In my professional life I design and write code, which result in facing up to everyday problems with the teams I work with.

These realities do impose constraints in terms of whitelisted/blacklisted libraries, coding practices, software and tools versions and not last delivery times.

Many conference sessions are about pure theory, which is nice but often clash with the everyday problems. My job is also about finding the right balance and satisfying the requirements.

OData is one perfect example for this balancing. From a pure technological standpoint we would love to always work with pure REST solutions but in the real life sometimes we need a sort of fast lane that allows to solve big problems with simple technology.

Most of my session talks more about the design perspective where the code is still the king because software architecture is indeed about writing real code.

Q: Tell us a bit more about yourself

A: I love solving problems, my thoughts are always in a sort of "life hacking" mode. Computing is probably the best and more natural way to satisfy my mind. Usually I do not like gaming, I love writing code even in my spare time. My passion began with hardware and I consider myself a maker as I still spend time with the solder, micro-controllers and sensors.

However, at the very end modern digital hardware need software, which comes back to writing code.

As a father, I tend not to push my son and my daughter into my world because coding software is delightful if you love it, otherwise is pure nightmare.

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6 Days to the kick off: featured session of the day - Extending RWD with Lightweight Client-side Device Detection by Dino Esposito

Less than one week, and today we feature another session for just after lunch break: Extending RWD with Lightweight Client-side Device Detection and we asked Dino Esposito to tell us more about his session and about himself.

Which session will you attend? This one on device detection with JavaScript, one about software architecture with ASP.NET MVC or about performance and memory profiling on Azure?

Q: Tell us a bit more about your session

A: About a couple of years ago I asked a guru an opinion about device detection. He said you “Man, don’t need it. There are essentially two ways of doing mobile web development. One is building a bunch of pages that responsively work everywhere. The other is building two versions of the site, one of which is an m-site. The m-site is still responsive but designed for mobile devices and thus sending less content.”

I read the email quite a few times, then I went to the toilet, stood up for a while in front of the mirror and then I said it: “Man, this guru is an idiot!” As I read it, the guru was trying to make the following points:

  • RWD allows you creating pages that can adapt to any screens.
  • RWD is so powerful that you can even use it to target mobile devices.
  • Who does or pushes device detection is taking you on the wrong path.
  • If you’re just willing to waste your time and money then feel free to set up a mobile-specific site, different from the primary one.
  • Mobile-first will save the world. - About two years later I came to the same conclusion, but following a significantly different reasoning. Most of the time, all you need is RWD and a lightweight form of device detection that redirects to a mobile-specific site from the same URL. The one-site experience is preserved, the user is at the center of the universe, and mobile-first … is out of the way. Yes, you’ve got it right: mobile-first makes no sense and it is just a marketing slogan. Small-first is what it really means and it applies to implementation. Your planning of the site, and your architecture, should be instead device-friendly and target smartphones and smaller-screen devices differently from tablets. Even largest smartphones are too small to render appropriately the same content devised for an average desktop screen. RWD you say? At the end of the day, RWD is only good at hiding things once they’ve been downloaded (oh yes, 3G downloads do count!)

In this talk, you’ll get a perspective of devices that emphasizes the power of RWD for screens up to tablets and suggests device detection and m-sites for smartphones or, in general, for anything that screen-wise falls below a given breakpoint. There are numerous examples of companies and organizations that more or less silently are using optimized m-sites on some categories of devices. Device detection can be done on the client or on the server, with different benefits and costs. Nicely enough, everything discussed in the talk — the WURFL.JS framework — is available for free.

Finally, the talk offers the perspective of a youngster—one of those customers who just wish to have an app for everything and are able to throw any app away after two weeks. M-sites are quite different from native apps in terms of performance and experience. Even with Xamarin, though, you can’t always find the margin to build an app for everything. Not to mention that pushing an app takes a lot more than pushing updates to a web site. The question is, should we take a second look at Cordova?

Q: Tell us a bit more about yourself

A: Author of many popular books that helped the professional growth of thousands of .NET developers, I've been speaking at events of any size for well over a decade. At present I'm a technical evangelist for JetBrains and member of the team that manages WURFL—the mobile backend tool used by Facebook.

Register to the Web European Conference

If you want to attend this session but haven't registered to the Web European Conference yet, you still have some time: go register before all 900 tickets are gone.

7 Days to the kick off: featured session of the day - Capture, record, clip, embed and play, search: video from newbie to ninja by Vito Flavio Lorusso

Two days ago we featured ReactJS in a real world application by Emanuele DelBono. Today with one week to go, we feature another session for the mid-afternoon: Capture, record, clip, embed and play, search: video from newbie to ninja and we asked Vito Flavio Lorusso to tell us more about his session and about himself.

The choice is yours: JavaScript or video production and hosting with Azure?

Q: Tell us a bit more about your session

A: This session is about understanding how you can use and leverage building blocks in the Azure Cloud to add video production features to your solutions.

Media management has been a very niche market for those who have premium content and required very expensive hardware. In web sites the most use of Video you would do could be embedding a YouTube video in a web page or a Flash Media Player, but all the video preparation, the special effects and the authoring would be still left to professional people other than web developers as the video production and value chain was only possible with expensive authoring and streaming tools.

User driven content, better and lower priced cameras and the Cloud have democratized the video workflow and made it possible for developers to approach the full value chain of video without needing to dig into the details. HTML5 has also enabled to reuse the same web development skills used for web applications, to rich video players and eventually video editing software, without needing to learn other languages and paradigms as those in Adobe Flash.

The story with Azure is even more compelling as there is no need to know how to install video capturing, processing and streaming software as the Azure Media Services platform offers anything that you need to ingest, transform and stream videos with nice REST APIs and specialized and easy to use SDKs for .Net, Java, PHP and more.

I will be covering how to manage with code video entities in the platform, how to stream live content and playback, some cool video processing features and eventually some rich video player experiences. I will be using the familiar Asp.Net development language, but will share few examples with other languages.

That’s how I hope I will get you interested in video and taking your first steps in becoming a video ninja

Q: Tell us a bit more about yourself

A: I am a Senior Program Manager in Microsoft working on Cloud Technologies since 4 years. My current job is being a Tech Advisor and Cloud Architect for cloud workloads enablers and worldwide video projects on Microsoft Azure. I spoke at IBC on the video work-flow we used for last FIFA World Cup live streaming.

Working and enjoying technology since I was a kid.

7 Days to the kick off: featured session of the day - You Can Have it Both Ways: Using Web Components in a React UI by Massimiliano Mantione

One week from today the Web European Conference starts and today's featured session is You Can Have it Both Ways: Using Web Components in a React UI> and we asked Massimiliano Mantione to tell us more about his session and about himself. This session is immediately after the keynote, in the same room. Another parallel session is Going Further with ASP.NET 5 by Tugberk Ugurlu. So, are you more interested in the future of client-side development or the future of ASP.NET development?

Q: Tell us a bit more about your session

A: I decided to prepare this talk because I had a question that needed an answer: is it possible to use Web Components in a React-based web application?

I definitely love React, mostly for the kind of functional programming that it enables building UIs on the client side. But I also see that Web Components are here to stay: they are not just "yet another web framework", they are positioned to become literally the future of the DOM. So, even if I love React, I cannot ignore them...

In this talk we'll give a clear answer to the question above. After that we'll also see how much Web Components "play nice" in an a very functional React environment, including hot reloading and a time-traveling debugging tool.

Q: Tell us a bit more about yourself

A:I am a software engineer at heart.

I am mostly interested in programming languages and compilers (I have worked in the V8 team in Google for 1.5 years and on the Mono JIT for almost 6 years), and these days in scalable cloud-based architectures.

8 Days to the kick off: featured session of the day - DDD, CQRS and testing with ASP.Net MVC by Andy Butland

So far we explored one session per time-slot: with 8 days the Web European Conference, we are featuring another talk for the first slot of the afternoon, DDD, CQRS and testing with ASP.Net MVC and we asked Andy Butland to tell us more about his session and about himself. The other session for this time slot is Optimizing web apps using AppInsights, memory and performance profiling by Maarten Balliauw, so you can start making your first choice: Azure or software architecture with ASP.NET MVC?

Q: Tell us a bit more about your session

A:The topic I plan to cover in my session at the conference stems primarily from a process I went through around a year ago moving back into custom web application development from a period working mostly on CMS projects. I wanted to try to distil information I'd been reading from a number of book and online sources, to try to find an appropriate architecture and set of techniques for the applications I was looking to build. Something that followed best practices but wasn't overkill from a complex archeticture perspective for the projects.

In essence I found that whilst methods such as DDD (domain driven design) and CQRS (command query responsibility segregation) may often be considered as appropriate for very large scale applications, they have a lot of benefits when applied even for medium sized projects. In the talk I plan to cover some of these techniques and how I've used them in order to produce what feels to me to be a clear, testable and maintainable code base.

Q: Tell us a bit more about yourself

A: I have been building websites and applications, primarily on the Microsoft stack, since the days of classic ASP. My tools of choice these days are ASP.Net MVC, SQL Server, Entity Framework, JavaScript and the CMS platforms Umbraco and EPiServer. I work at Zone, a primarily UK based digital agency, where he heads up the .Net development team working on projects for Coca-Cola, Tesco, RSPB and other clients.

Although earning the Ryanair frequent flyer points by working from the London office every couple of weeks or so, I live in Bassano del Grappa, Italy, with a very short commute to my home office.

Register to the Web European Conference

If you want to attend this session but haven't registered to the Web European Conference yet, you still have some time: go register before all 900 tickets are gone.

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