3 Days to the kick off: featured session of the day - Micro Interactions & Microservices by Roberto Nocera & Angelo Oldani

Just 3 days, the featured session is Micro Interactions & Microservices - Little things matter and we asked to the two presenters, Roberto Nocera and Angelo Oldani to tell us more about his session and about himself.

With this session we have featured 4 sessions per slot and from this afternoon we'll be filling in the last option for each of the slots.

Q: Tell us a bit more about your session

A: This session could be seen as the black sheep of the conference for two reasons!
The first one is that this speech will be held by two guys who have different roles in Avanade: Angelo, the Experience Designer and Roberto, the Solution Architect.

The other reason is that in this presentation you will not hear just about code, .net technologies and MVP; there will be design, details and emotions as well.

This blending is our response of new people’s needs; right now users are expecting rich, immersive and dynamic experiences.

In this speech we would like to tell you how design and development can accommodate those expectations and how they can cooperate together in order to achieve better results. In both sides, design and development, two trends are emerging: Microinteractions and Microservices.

Angelo will tell about Microinteractions a new way to think how we can design details in digital product and services; as the famous designer Charles Eames said: “The details are not the details. They make the product.”

Roberto will talk about Microservices and how new technical solutions are able to achieve the huge challenges in which we are involved today. To understand why Microservices is as much about team organizational attitude as it's about technological attitude come to session.

Q: Tell us a bit more about yourself

A: Angelo designs systems, interfaces and services that follow the guide- lines of User-Centered Design methodology, focusing on user interaction and producing involving emotional experiences

Roberto Nocera is senior Digital Solution Architect working for Avanade Italy. With over 15 years of experience in IT consulting, he spent last years to help customers to implement and deploy important Customer Relationship Management projects in Europe across different industries. He is involved in challenging projects to create Customer Experience solutions with high value-added. Roberto is a Microsoft Dynamics CRM MVP since 2009 and Sitecore Technology MVP. He is a committed maker and in his spare time he likes to play with many technology gadgets.

Register to the Web European Conference

If you want to attend this session but haven't registered to the Web European Conference yet, you still have some time: go register before all 900 tickets are gone.

4 Days to the kick off: featured session of the day - Taming Asyncrony using RxJS by Angelo Simone Scotto

Looking for some a different approach on Async with Javascript? Maybe Taming Asyncrony using RxJS by Angelo Simone Scotto could be the session for you.

If not, as last session of the day you could also choose a different approach to Javascript, with TypeScript, or a different approach to learning a new language.

Q: Tell us a bit more about your session

A: My session is about "Reactive Extensions" (Rx); speaking about Rx is really exciting because in our work it's rare to find something really new, but Rx, with its Observable pattern, somehow did it.

It showed us something that even the venerable Gang of Four in their "Design Pattern" book missed, that Iterator and Observer patterns were really different views of the same thing, quite interesting stuff.

In the first half of the session we will introduce the Observable pattern as it was introduced historically, as a way to make Iterator pattern Async and then we will show the similarities with the Observer pattern and how, at the end of the day, Rx team at Microsoft, noticed also that this new pattern was also able to express Promises (the cornerstone of modern async programming).

At that point, with a lot of theory but zero code written, we will start a small demo about how to use Observable in Javascript using the RxJS library.

Then we will start to introduce other aspects of Rx (mainly grammar and operations to manipulate Observables) and we will end up with a more complex demo of an autocomplete webpage written using Rx.

Then we have to briefly introduce Rx schedulers (briefly because schedulers are of huge importance in Rx implementations for other languages but, since Javascript is single-threaded, RxJS schedulers are few and usually the default RxJS choice is approriate for common use cases and rarely one needs to handle them directly).

If i've still space I would like to share the same tutorial reference i'll add at the end of the presentation for people who wants to deepen the topic.

  • ReactiveX: Homepage of RX project.
  • LearnRX: Online tutorial, published initially by Netflix as training for its developers.
  • RxJSKoans: GitHub repository full of small exercises of increasing difficulty using RxJS.
  • Rx Workshop: A set of videos teaching you Rx.NET directly from Rx team members.

Q: Tell us a bit more about yourself

A: First of all i'm a software developer, even if after 10 years of experience, as you can imagine, my role in the company changed quite a lot.

I'm a Cluster Reply employee and my current title is something like "Solution Architect" and "Technical Advisor", and what it really means to me is just being a software developer with added responsability such as teaching and introducing colleagues to new technologies, patterns and architectures and, obviously, be blamed when something don't work out as intended.

My main interest is about message-oriented middleware and integration systems because I discovered soon, thanks to the ubiquity of internet and IP protocol, that every system (yes, websites too) we realize these days has strict integration/communication requirements and satistying them (with SOA, ESB, EAI, Microservices or whatever) is probably one of the most important part of every IT project.

To quote Michael Nygard "Release It!" wonderful book:

I haven't seen a "pure-website" project since about 1996. If your projects are like mine, they have probably been enterprise integration projects that happen to have an HTML-based front end.

Register to the Web European Conference

If you want to attend this session but haven't registered to the Web European Conference yet, you still have some time: go register before all 900 tickets are gone.

4 Days to the kick off: featured session of the day - Rapid Mobile Development with Ionic framework by Alessio Delmonti

The only session about mobile development of this conference is the one featured today, with just 4 days to wait before the conference starts: Rapid Mobile Development with Ionic framework and we asked Alessio Delmonti to tell us more about his session and about himself.

But if you are not into mobile development, on the first session after Scott's keynote, you choose to learn about the new ASP.NET 5, or ReactJS with WebComponents.

Q: Tell us a bit more about your session

A: The aim of this session is to give a complete overview about what is ionic framework, why is a valid option for the rapid cross-platform development and how to get started quickly.

We will start exploring the framework's architecture and his components, then we will go ahead to the installation process and the explanation of the project structure.

We will use the demo app to discuss best practices and good habits in a real life apps, how to solve some common performance issues and some useful tool and plugins to solve common problems in Cordova apps.

Q: Tell us a bit more about yourself

A: I am mostly interested in software development and entrepreneurship, in the past 7 years I've worked for different startups, in 2013 I co-founded my own first company Wiralist where I worked as CTO until 2015.

During the last six months I've has been traveling between Europe and Silicon Valley and now I'm based in London and working as ionic-enthusiast in Voyage control.

In 2014 I founded the Italian Ionic framework community and since then I try to spread the word of this amazing technology.

Register to the Web European Conference

If you want to attend this session but haven't registered to the Web European Conference yet, you still have some time: go register before all 900 tickets are gone.

4 Days to the kick off: featured session of the day - Experimenting with ServiceWorker by Sandro Paganotti

4 days to the Web European Conference, the first featured session of the day is Experimenting with ServiceWorker and we asked Sandro Paganotti to tell us more about his session and about himself.

Q: Tell us a bit more about your session

A: ServiceWorker has gained a lot of traction during the past year and a half. While not yet fully supported, the changes it introduces into the web application world are huge. Offline first web application with custom caching strategies, push notification and background synchronization, to name just a few. This talks is designed with the idea to give a glimpse of what the Service Worker is capable of when solving real life problems.

We will start by exploring a few 'standard' use case and the we'll move into more 'edge' stuff; there will be demos - hopefully all of them will work - and some code to look at and discuss, just a few slides with the most interesting bits.

I don't want to spoiler here the use cases but they will try to cover various ways of how we can take advantage of this new network layer we can manipulate within the browser. Wanna know more? Join me at 16:30 in Room2 :D

Q: Tell us a bit more about yourself

A: I'm an early adopter, front-end developer, interested into everything that gravitates around the 'holy' trinity of the web: HTML/CSS/JS and all the efforts made to keep it modern and performant.

I love to experiment and build with everything new and shiny the web has to offer: Service Workers, ES6, Request Idle Callback.. Nonetheless I remain a firm believer in progressive enhancement.

I'm wishing for a future where the web will be able to compete with the native, especially on mobile, and where everything will run at 60fps and offline. I live in London and work at Facebook.

Register to the Web European Conference

If you want to attend this session but haven't registered to the Web European Conference yet, you still have some time: go register before all 900 tickets are gone.

5 Days to the kick off: featured session of the day - Code Cooking by Code Cooking by Rui Carvalho

We are entering the week of the conference, and today we are featuring a type of session which something you might have not seen in many other conferences: Code Cooking and we asked Rui Carvalho to tell us more about his session and about himself.

This session will be the last of the day, but it is partially interactive, so there will be less chances you fall asleep after the intense day. On the same time-slot there will also be a session on TypeScript by Alessandro Giorgetti.

Q: Tell us a bit more about your session

A:The talk is about learning things in a different way.

It's even more about showing you a technique that I learned some time before and that I hope you'll try and present to other people too. I'll quickly introduce you the practice but we'll spend some time testing it live.

It's like a coding dojo format but instead of being a canvas for practicing it is one for learning new things in a very quickly and efficient way.

By the way, I'll need some assistance from the Web European Conference participants! I'll need some volunteers that will try to learn something during the session and someone that can teach something. If you know some functional language like Haskell or Erlang, or if you want to show people how to create a small site in Sinatra or ASPNET 5 it would be cool too, contact me before the day or even during the conference!

Q: Tell us a bit more about yourself

A: I'm mostly a developer trying to master everyday its art for being a better craftsman.

I've been playing with Microsoft web stack for more than 15 years now and doing open source in that field even before .Net.

I'm now an independent consultant since many years and I spend my day helping clients building products that matter, teaching the next generation of software engineers, talking at conferences and organizing meetups for the french alt.net group and others.

I also organize an international developer conference in April/May in Paris called Ncrafts that I highly recommend you!

Register to the Web European Conference

If you want to attend this session but haven't registered to the Web European Conference yet, you still have some time: go register before all 900 tickets are gone.

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